Gilbert House Fellowship #278: Exodus 14-15

THE RED SEA crossing is an iconic moment in the Bible, the history of Israel, and in movies (thanks to legendary producer/director Cecil B. DeMille). But it’s way cooler than you might know.

We explain why this event was far more than just Israel’s escape from Egypt. For example, have you ever noticed that God directed Moses to turn around and camp—in other words, to stop and wait for the Egyptian chariots to catch up?

The significance of their campsite is also important, and we note the presence of other supernatural players in this drama. God didn’t just deliver Israel from the hand of pharaoh; He delivered Israel from the gods—the rebel angels who had rejected His authority.


Our free mobile app for iOS and Android brings these studies right to your smartphone or tablet! Links to the iTunes App Store and Google Play are on the main page at www.GilbertHouse.org.

Join us in Israel next year! We will lead another tour through the Holy Land April 18-May 1, 2021, with an optional three-day extension to Mount Nebo, Wadi Rum, and Petra in Jordan.

For more information, log on to SkyWatchTV.com/IsraelTour.

Our latest book Veneration is available for Amazon’s Kindle e-book reader! Click here and find out why readers rate Veneration 4.7 out of 5, describing it as “a must read” that “opens up…the Bible’s hidden mysteries.”

Click here for the complete archive of our New Testament Bible studies to date, and click here for the Old Testament studies to date. Or go to www.spreaker.com/show/gilbert-house-fellowship for all of the audio.

6 Comments

Filed under Bible Study, Old Testament

6 Responses to Gilbert House Fellowship #278: Exodus 14-15

  1. Ruth Czerniak

    I enjoy your ministry and have purchased your material, including the DVD Search for the Titans Pt 1 & 2. I was so looking forward to the 2nd part, and would like to one day attend an Israel tour. As a retired pastor, author and fan of Associates for Biblical Research I am interested in anything Biblical and Archaeological. I enjoyed hearing Rabbi Zev and Derek share. I would comment, however, that Carl Gallop, while long on information, tended to monopolize and interject when others were sharing, but didn’t show the same regard he demanded when others spoke. I would buy his book, though. A retired pastor once shared with me: be sure you don’t dump the whole load of hay when one bale will do ; ) Blessings, Pastor Ruth

  2. kaye newcombe

    My tablet will not open for your info says unsafe site is there another way to get info cost ect?

  3. Pingback: Crossing the sea – Weapon of Mass Distraction

  4. Janie Tink

    According to Dr. E.L. Terry, the sea opening would have to be wide enough for 5,000 people to cross side by side non-stop. God calls this a path in the sea (Psalm 77:19), which is a word for a passageway.

    The crossing was God’s eleventh judgment against the Egyptian Baal gods.

    The crossing doesn’t represent baptism because they didn’t get wet…it represents going through the blood, in my opinion.

    The bitter waters of Marah made sweet is a picture of how, through the cross of Christ, the bitterness in our lives is made sweet when we receive His atoning, redemptive work.

  5. Chris

    1 Corinthians 10 King James Version (KJV)

    10 Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea;

    2 And were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea;

    I say this not in spite or hate but: that is the problem when people put their own interpretation to scripture. One should not add things to scripture just because “I Think” this is what it means. That way you go down a dark road.
    Warm Christian love

    • Hi, Chris: We appreciate your comment. All we’re doing is analyzing the story through the worldview of those who lived at the time. It does not in any way contradict the gospel. To the contrary, it helps to illustrate why the gospel is so powerful. “Who is like you, O Lord, among the gods?”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.