Gilbert House Fellowship #97: Matthew 24-25

The destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70AD -- a painting by David Roberts (1796-1849)

The destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70AD — a painting by David Roberts (1796-1849).

MATTHEW 24 and 25 are among the most important chapters in the New Testament. Jesus spells out the future days of vengeance on Israel, the days of Tribulation, and the return of the Messiah to reign on Earth.

We discuss these chapters and why their intended audience was the Jews (although some scholars disagree, arguing that Matthew 24 and 25 apply to the Church and not to the Jewish people). We consider the parables of the Ten Virgins and the Talents in light of their application to the Jews alone, and the judgment of the sheep and goats in Matthew 25 being a judgment of Gentiles during the Tribulation, with salvation for those who showed kindness to “the least of these my brothers” — the Jews.

This contradicts a new teaching that incorrectly interprets Matthew 25:31-46 as a judgment of nations, rather than people — the lesson being that believers must ensure that they’re living in a “sheep nation” and not a “goat nation” (presumably by taking control and forcing people to behave) to avoid being sent “into eternal punishment”!

Click here for the complete archive of our New Testament Bible studies to date, and click here for the Old Testament studies to date.

1 Comment

Filed under Bible Study, New Testament

One Response to Gilbert House Fellowship #97: Matthew 24-25

  1. Kathy Ruth

    Thanks for the insights on the man with one talent. I never understood the comments he made about God and God’s response to him. It makes sense as Sharon said that the man didn’t really know God at all. I never quite understood what was meant by “the bankers’ either but after this study, I think it could mean the man didn’t use his talent at all. No matter what we do for God, even if it is a small thing in our eyes, it isn’t small in God’s eyes. We need to use whatever talents we have for the Lord. Not wish we had more but use what we have. Kind of an obvious explanation I guess but it helps me to understand this parable. Thanks so much. Keep up your good work.

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